Undergraduate

本科生


Undergraduate Programs of Biomedical Engineering

Description 

Sustech Biomedical Engineering Department absorbed Columbia University's Department of biomedical engineering undergraduate training courses, established the cultivating way of the enhanced version of the Columbia University Biomedical Engineering,  The programs in biomedical engineering at Sustech (B.S.,M.S., Ph.D., Eng.Sc.D., and M.D./Ph.D.) prepare students to apply engineering and applied science to problems in biology, medicine, and the understanding of living systems and their behavior, and to develop biomedical systems and devices. Modern engineering encompasses sophisticated approaches to measurement, data acquisition and analysis, simulation, and systems identification. These approaches are useful in the study of individual cells, organs, entire organisms, and populations of organisms. The increasing value of mathematical models in the analysis of living systems is an important sign of the success of contemporary activity. The programs offered in the Department of Biomedical Engineering seek to emphasize the confluence of basic engineering science and applied engineering with the physical and biological sciences, particularly in the areas of biomechanics, cell and tissue engineering, and biosignals and biomedical imaging. 

Programs in biomedical engineering are taught by its own faculty, members of other Engineering departments, and faculty from other University divisions who have strong interests and involvement in biomedical engineering. Several of the faculty holds joint appointments in Biomedical Engineering and other University departments. Educational programs at all levels are based on engineering and biological fundamentals. From this basis, the program branches into concentrations along three tracks: biomechanics, cell and tissue engineering, and biosignals and biomedical imaging. The intrinsic breadth of these tracks, and a substantial elective content, prepare bachelor’s and master’s students to commence professional activity in any area of biomedical engineering or to go on to graduate school for further studies in related fields. 


Undergraduate Program 

The objectives of the undergraduate program in biomedical engineering are as follows:

1. Professional employment in areas such as the medical device industry, engineering consulting, and biotechnology; 

2. Graduate studies in biomedical engineering or related fields;

3. Attendance at medical, dental, or other professional schools.


The undergraduate program in biomedical engineering will prepare graduates who will have:

(a) An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

(b) An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

(d) An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams 

(e) An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

(f) An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) An ability to communicate effectively

(h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

(i) A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) A knowledge of contemporary issues (k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

(l) An understanding of biology and physiology

(m) The capability to apply advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), science, and engineering, to solve the problems at the interface of engineering and biology

(n) The ability to make measurements on and interpret data from living systems, addressing the problems associated with the interaction between living and nonliving materials and systems.


The first two years provides a strong grounding in the physical and chemical sciences, engineering fundamentals, mathematics, and modern biology. This background is used to provide a unique physical approach to the study of biological systems. The last two years of the undergraduate program provide substantial exposure to fundamentals in biomedical engineering with emphasis on the integration of principles of biomedical engineering, quantitative analysis of physiology, and experimental quantification and measurements of biomedical systems. The common core biomedical engineering curriculum provides a broad yet solid foundation in biomedical engineering. The flexible choice of technical electives in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, other departments in the Engineering School, as well as in other departments in the arts and sciences allows students to broaden their biomedical engineering education to their individualized interests for a personalized curriculum. These qualities allow the faculty to prepare students for activity in all contemporary areas of biomedical engineering. Graduates of the program are equipped for employment in the large industrial sector devoted to health care, which includes pharmaceuticals, medical devices, artificial organs, prosthetics and sensory aids, diagnostics, medical instrumentation, and medical imaging. 


Graduates also accept employment in oversight organizations (FDA, NIH, OSHA, and others), medical centers, and research institutes. They are prepared for graduate study in biomedical engineering and several related areas of engineering and the health sciences. Students can meet entrance requirements for graduate training in the various allied health professions. No more than three additional courses are required to satisfy entrance requirements for most U.S. medical schools.


BSc in Bioinformatics Requirements

Students are required to complete the University and their major programs requirements for graduation. For details please refer to General Education Required Courses, Major Required Courses (Table 1), Major Elective Courses (Table 2). Required credits are as follows:


GE Required Courses: 68.5 cr.

GE Elective Courses: 10 cr.

Major Foundational Courses: 19 cr.

Major Core Courses: 18 cr.

Major Elective Courses: 29 cr.

Graduation Thesis/Projects, Research Projects, Internship: 12 cr.

Minimum required Credits for graduation: 156.5 cr.


Core course introduction 

1.BME201 Quantitative Physiology I (3)

Lecture,3 credits,3 hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL C2005 and C2006. Physiological systems at the cellular and molecular level are examined in a highly quantitative context. Topics include chemical kinetics, molecular binding and enzymatic processes, molecular motors, biological membranes, and muscles.

2.BME202 Quantitative Physiology II(3)

Lecture,3 credits,3 hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL C2005 and C2006. Students are introduced to a quantitative, engineering approach to cellular biology and mammalian physiology. Beginning with biological issues related to the cell, the course progresses to considerations of the major physiological systems of the human body (nervous, circulatory, respiratory, renal). 

3.BME203 Biomedical Engineering I(3)

Lecture,3 credits,3 hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006. Various concepts within the field of biomedical engineering, foundational knowledge of engineering methodology applied to biological and/or medical problems through modules in biomechanics, biomaterials, and cell & tissue engineering.

4.BME204 Biomedical Engineering II (3)

Lecture, 3 credits,3 hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL C2005 and BIOL C2006. Various concepts within the field of biomedical engineering, foundational knowledge of engineering methodology applied to biological and/or medical problems through modules in biomechanics, bioinstrumentation, and biomedical Imaging.

5.BME211 Biomedical Engineering Lab I (3)

Laboratory, 3 credits,3 hours per week. Fundamental considerations of wave mechanics; design philosophies; reliability and risk concepts; basics of fluid mechanics; design of structures subjected to blast; elements of seismic design; elements of fire design; flood considerations; advanced analysis in support of structural design.

6.BME212 Biomedical Engineering Lab II (3)

Laboratory, 3 credits, 3 hours per week. Biomedical experimental design and hypothesis testing. Statistical analysis of experimental measurements. Analysis of experimental measurements. Analysis of variance, post hoc testing. Fluid shear and cell adhesion, neuro-electrophysiology, soft tissue biomechanics, biomecial imaging and ultrasound, characterization of excitable tissues, microfluidics. 

7.BME221 Biomedical Engineering Design I (4)

Lecture, 4 credits,4 hours per week. A two-semester design sequence to be taken in the senior year. Elements of the design process, with specific applications to biomedical engineering: concept formulation, systems synthesis, design analysis, optimization, biocompatibility, impact on patient health and comfort, health care costs, regulatory issues, and medical ethics. Selection and execution of a project involving the design of an actual engineering device or system. Introduction to entrepreneurship, biomedical start-ups, and venture capital. Semester I: statistical analysis of detection/classification systems (receiver operation characteristic analysis, logistic regression), development of design prototype, need, approach, benefits and competition analysis. 

8.BME221 Biomedical Engineering Design II (4)

Lecture, 4 credits, 4 hours per week. A two-semester design sequence to be taken in the senior year. Elements of the design process, with specific applications to biomedical engineering: concept formulation, systems synthesis, design analysis, optimization, biocompatibility, impact on patient health and comfort, health care costs, regulatory issues, and medical ethics. Selection and execution of a project involving the design of an actual engineering device or system. Introduction to entrepreneurship, biomedical start-ups, and venture capital. Semester II: spiral develop process and testing, iteration and refinement of the initial design/prototype and business plan development.


Course structure